THÉLIOS

LVMH and Marcolin have pooled their expertise to create Thélios. Thélios introduces an ambitious vision that makes eyewear an essential accessory that follows the rhythm of the ready-to-wear collections of LVMH Houses to meet the expectations of today’s demanding consumers.

This joint venture is anchored by three key missions:

  • Close collaboration with each LVMH partner House, respecting their identity
  • Excellence at each stage of the production, gathering craftsmanship and innovation
  • Quality of the customer experience, with control over every aspect of distribution

Thélios has a long-term vision and is committed to developing employment in its host regions in France and Italy’s Longarone region, renowned for its eyewear manufacturing expertise.

Spotlight on Future LIFE event: 25 years of green history at LVMH

In 2017, LVMH celebrated the 25th anniversary of its Environment Department with a special event called “Future LIFE”.

© LVMH

The LVMH Group created a full-fledged Environment Department reporting directly to top management in 1992, the year of the Earth Summit. The new department was tasked with setting ambitious environmental objectives for LVMH and with providing support for Maisons to achieve these objectives.

 

Future LIFE - Retrospective film

 

Opened by LVMH Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Bernard Arnault, the ceremony featured presentations by LVMH Maisons of concrete commitments made to meet the our key objectives of the LIFE 2020 program. Many of the CEOs personally presented the initiatives by their Maisons, including Michael Burke (Louis Vuitton), Chris de Lapuente (Sephora) and Philippe Schaus (Moët Hennessy). Guest speakers Bertrand Piccard, Chairman of the Solar Impulse Foundation, and Tony Estanguet, Co-Chairman of the Paris 2024 Olympic Committee also shared insights. The speakers highlighted pioneering initiatives by LVMH and the high strategic priority accorded to sustainable development by the Group and its Maisons.

“By embedding ecological imperatives as a source of innovation, we very early made environmental responsibility a pillar of our growth strategy. The LVMH Group is proud of its pioneering role for the past 25 years, and we aim to remain trailblazers,” said Bernard Arnault, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of LVMH.

Future LIFE - Highlights of the event

The LVMH Group launched the LIFE program in 2012 to accelerate the environmental and sustainability strategy deployed since 1992. As the foundation of the Group’s environmental strategy, LIFE encompasses, production, supply chain, retail and design activities at LVMH’s 70 Maisons. This major program engages each of the Group’s 145,000 employees.

LVMH established an internal carbon fund in 2015 within the framework of this program, creating a powerful lever to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions of LVMH and its Maisons by 25%, thus contributing to international efforts to limit global warming. The program has been a resounding success, with more than six million euros invested in projects.

Today, LVMH reasserts its commitment to making protection of the environment a key growth driver, expanding the LIFE program with new objectives for 2020. This resolute commitment is based on four pillars that engage all the Group’s business sectors and activities:  products, supply chain, CO2 and sites. For each pillar, concrete objectives have been set:

Product objective: Mitigate the environmental footprint of product creation. By 2020 the Group aims to improve the environmental performance of all its products, covering the entire lifecycle.

Supply Chain objective: More closely monitor the traceability and conformity of the raw materials used to create our exceptional  products while at the same time preserving natural resources and applying the highest standards across 70% of procurement chains.

CO2 objective: Reduce CO2 emissions by 25% by 2020, pursuing initiatives introduced to fight climate change. The LVMH Group pioneered a trend among businesses in 2002 by introducing carbon reporting  at its Maisons. In 2015 LVMH again proved a trailblazer by creating an in-house Carbon Fund, announced during the COP21 conference.

Site objective: All sites will target an improvement of at least 10% in environmental  performance indicators including water and energy consumption and waste production. The Maisons are also committed to improving their energy efficiency by 15%.

Future LIFE - LIFE 2020 program

LIFE 2020 marks an important new phase, giving LVMH Maisons a clear vision and strengthening our capacity for initiative. This roadmap has unlocked creative energies by opening up opportunities and driving innovation and growth while unifying teams around shared goals.

LVMH Ethics & Compliance Policy

As the leader in its industry, LVMH has a particular responsibility to demonstrate exemplary behavior. This is why LVMH signed the United Nations Global Compact in 2003. Along with the Universal Declaration of Human rights, this document inspired the definition of the Code of Conduct adopted by the LVMH Group in 2009, which was circulated to all employees.

© LVMH

LVMH has strengthened this commitment in 2017, updating the Code of Conduct to reaffirm the convictions and ethical principles that guide the Group. This Code of Conduct sets out the principles to which LVMH adheres in the conduct of its businesses. It presents the rules that all employees must follow in the exercise of their responsibilities, placing special emphasis on the integrity expected of all members of the Group. At the same time, this Code of Conduct ensures consistency and continuous improvements in practices at all Maisons.

The LVMH Code of Conduct encompasses six fundamental principles:

  • Act responsibly and with social awareness;
  • Provide a fulfilling work environment and recognize talents;
  • Be committed to protecting the environment;
  • Retain the trust of customers;
  • Retain the confidence of shareholders;
  • Act with and guarantee integrity in the conduct of business.

Adaptations of this Code of Conduct to specific areas are set out in the LVMH Environmental Charter and Supplier Code of Conduct, as well as in internal guidelines and codes of practice.

These measures represent a clear expression of the company’s commitment to exemplary ethics in general, and reaffirm the role that a Group with the stature of LVMH must play in society.

LVMH Code of Conduct

LVMH Supplier Code of Conduct

LVMH Ethics & Compliance Policy

As the leader in its industry, LVMH has a particular responsibility to demonstrate exemplary behavior. This is why LVMH signed the United Nations Global Compact in 2003. Along with the Universal Declaration of Human rights, this document inspired the definition of the Code of Conduct adopted by the LVMH Group in 2009, which was circulated to all employees.

© LVMH

LVMH has strengthened this commitment in 2017, updating the Code of Conduct to reaffirm the convictions and ethical principles that guide the Group. This Code of Conduct sets out the principles to which LVMH adheres in the conduct of its businesses. It presents the rules that all employees must follow in the exercise of their responsibilities, placing special emphasis on the integrity expected of all members of the Group. At the same time, this Code of Conduct ensures consistency and continuous improvements in practices at all Maisons.

The LVMH Code of Conduct encompasses six fundamental principles:

  • Act responsibly and with social awareness;
  • Provide a fulfilling work environment and recognize talents;
  • Be committed to protecting the environment;
  • Retain the trust of customers;
  • Retain the confidence of shareholders;
  • Act with and guarantee integrity in the conduct of business.

Adaptations of this Code of Conduct to specific areas are set out in the LVMH Environmental Charter and Supplier Code of Conduct, as well as in internal guidelines and codes of practice.

These measures represent a clear expression of the company’s commitment to exemplary ethics in general, and reaffirm the role that a Group with the stature of LVMH must play in society.

LVMH Code of Conduct

LVMH Supplier Code of Conduct

LVMH Ethics & Compliance Policy

As the leader in its industry, LVMH has a particular responsibility to demonstrate exemplary behavior. This is why LVMH signed the United Nations Global Compact in 2003. Along with the Universal Declaration of Human rights, this document inspired the definition of the Code of Conduct adopted by the LVMH Group in 2009, which was circulated to all employees.

© LVMH

LVMH has strengthened this commitment in 2017, updating the Code of Conduct to reaffirm the convictions and ethical principles that guide the Group. This Code of Conduct sets out the principles to which LVMH adheres in the conduct of its businesses. It presents the rules that all employees must follow in the exercise of their responsibilities, placing special emphasis on the integrity expected of all members of the Group. At the same time, this Code of Conduct ensures consistency and continuous improvements in practices at all Maisons.

The LVMH Code of Conduct encompasses six fundamental principles:

  • Act responsibly and with social awareness;
  • Provide a fulfilling work environment and recognize talents;
  • Be committed to protecting the environment;
  • Retain the trust of customers;
  • Retain the confidence of shareholders;
  • Act with and guarantee integrity in the conduct of business.

Adaptations of this Code of Conduct to specific areas are set out in the LVMH Environmental Charter and Supplier Code of Conduct, as well as in internal guidelines and codes of practice.

These measures represent a clear expression of the company’s commitment to exemplary ethics in general, and reaffirm the role that a Group with the stature of LVMH must play in society.

> LVMH Code of Conduct

LVMH Supplier Code of Conduct

Animal Sourcing Principles

LVMH is a member of the Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) network, which is a global leader in the corporate social, societal and environmental responsibility fields.

With regard to animal sourcing principles, a document sets out the general principles according to which all animals, both farmed and wildcaught, in our supply chains should be treated.

Please click here for the link to this document: https://www.bsr.org/files/work/SLWG_Animal_Sourcing_Principles.pdf

LVMH Houses powered by renewable energies!

Whether solar, wind, geothermal, tides or vegetation, renewable energy sources all share very limited (or even zero) carbon footprints, giving them pride of place in the global transition to clean energies. Renewal energies are also a priority in LVMH’s environmental policy. TAG Heuer and Loro Piana are among the LVMH Houses that are leading the way.

© Loro Piana

L’énergie solaire de TAG Heuer

TAG Heuer is a founding partner of FIA Formula E, the world racing championship for 100% electric cars, launched in 2014. This initiative springs directly from the  watchmaking house’s strong commitment to environmental excellence, articulated a decade ago. Today TAG Heuer keeps moving forward by deploying more renewable energies too. At its watch manufacture in La Chaux-de-Fonds, the company has installed one of the largest solar power systems in Western Switzerland. The 777 square meters of photovoltaic panels on the roofs of its buildings generate 108,000 kWh of electricity per year, equivalent to the consumption of 40 families.

© TAG Heuer

Sustainable production at Loro Piana

Manufacturing textiles consumes large amounts of energy, which is why Loro Piana now produces 45% of the electricity it uses annually internally, including 4% from renewable sources. The Maison has installed 11,000 square meters of photovoltaic panels at four of its six sites in Italy, eliminating 750 metric tons of C02 each year. It has also set up in 2013 a cogeneration system to produce both electricity and heat, cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 30%. Already in 1994 Loro Piana became the first company in the textile industry to invest in a natural gas turbine. Both installations produce every year around 14,500 MWh of electricity and 20,000 MWh of thermal energy, with a reduction of over 2,250 tons of CO2.

© Loro Piana

LVMH establishes internal carbon fund

LVMH established an internal carbon fund in November 2015, the first such initiative in the history of the Group. This initiative aims to create a virtuous circle to reduce greenhouse gas emissions generated by the Group and its Houses, contributing to international efforts to limit global warming. Watch this animated video to learn how the new fund works.

© LVMH

For the first time in its history LVMH announces the implementation of an internal carbon fund which is already estimated at over 5 million euros. The fund will be financed by contributions from each Maison, calculated using the greenhouse gas emissions generated by their activities,  specifically in terms of  energy consumption in their production sites and stores. Examples of the projects that will be financed by this fund are investments in energy consumption reduction equipment (LED and cooling equipment) or the production of renewable energy on an international scale.

“The most beautiful materials  used in viticulture and oenology, the creation of perfumes and cosmetics, fashion and leather goods and jewellery which are the heart of our business, are all provided by nature. Environmental performance has been integrated into the growth strategy of all our Maisons in the same way as quality, innovation and creativity. Today respect for the environment is not only an imperative, it is also a lever that drives progress.”, commented Bernard Arnault, Chairman and CEO of LVMH.

LVMH establishes internal carbon fund

The Maisons will each contribute 15/euros per tonne which is standard current practice. The price will be reviewed each year. The carbon fund will take effect in 2016.

The LVMH carbon fund is an additional step in the implementation of the LIFE programme (LVMH Initiatives For the Environment) which the Group created in 2013 in order to integrate the environment into the management processes of each Maison. It fits within all of the Group’s activities in relation to COP21, with which LVMH is one of the partners.

Construction: green buildings

The construction industry is the world’s third-largest source of greenhouse gas emissions. This has led LVMH to make environmental performance a priority criteria for all its sites, whether warehouses, stores or offices. Two truly remarkable projects illustrate this policy.

Château d’Yquem underground bottling unit © Château d’Yquem

Louis Vuitton’s pioneering warehouse

In 2007, Louis Vuitton opened a new international warehouse in Cergy-Pontoise, just north of Paris, dubbed “Eole”. The site is the first logistics building in France built to the demanding HQE (High Environmental Quality) standard as part of a pilot project. Eole is extremely energy efficient – resulting in 40% lower energy consumption in four years – thanks to the use of geothermal heating and  extensive use of natural daylight, coupled with the active involvement of all the site’s teams. The facility will continue to become even more energy efficient: after achieving ISO 14001 environmental certification for the warehouse in 2009, Louis Vuitton now aims to certify the site to the equivalent U.S. LEED green building standard.  Measures to further trim energy consumption at Eole include replacing conventional lighting with LEDs and installing nine solar-powered lamps at the entrance to the site. Click here to read more about Eole.

Eole © Louis Vuitton

Château d’Yquem underground bottling unit

Building an efficient, secure and eco-friendly bottling unit with minimal visual impact at a historic heritage site was a daunting challenge that Château d’Yquem  met with exemplary success. To minimize visual impact, the new storage space for the famed wine was built underground. Construction to HQE High Environmental Quality standards culminated in certification of the building. The bottling unit now enjoys very low energy consumption of just 4.16 kWh per square meter per year. This performance was achieved thanks to measures to optimize the building shell (including a thick ring of insulation made from glass beads), plus innovative installations that eliminate the need for heating and air-conditioning, and fluorescent lighting controlled by presence detectors in different zones.

© Château d’Yquem

Logistics to meet climate challenges

LVMH has conducted environmental audits at most of its Houses since 2002, enabling precise measurement of the contribution of logistics to its greenhouse gas emissions. This has led to a series of actions over the past two decades to deliver merchandise using methods that combine operational performance and environmental excellence, whether the transport distances are long or short. Discover several emblematic examples.

© Guerlain

Responsible logistics for LVMH Fragrance Brands and Louis Vuitton

To minimize the environmental impact of their logistics operations LVMH Fragrance Brands systematically opt for maritime transport rather than planes. Between 2014 and 2015, the unit’s Chinese and Mexican subsidiaries reduced the tonnage of merchandise transported by air by 37%. During the same period, the average percentage of maritime vs. air transportfor the fragrance brands rose from 56.6% to 63.7%.

Like LVMH Fragrance Brands, Louis Vuitton has for many years pursued responsible logistics. The Maison’s policy was formally recognized in 2013 when it earned ISO 14001 environmental certification for its Leather Goods and Accessories supply chain, becoming the first company in the world to deploy a “green supply chain”.

© Louis Vuitton

Green deliveries for Guerlain, Parfums Christian Dior and Sephora

Guerlain is another global trendsetter in environmental responsibility. Since May 2014, the House has been trialing zero emissions road transport to deliver products to its 17 stores in Paris. The project is a joint initiative with Speed Distribution Logistique and Renault Trucks, which has made a 100% electric experimental delivery truck. In one year Guerlain has already eliminated seven metric tons of CO2 emissions.

Sephora is focused on green deliveries too. In France, 60% of the beauty retailer’s stores are located in city centers, making deliveries complicated due to urban traffic. The company thus teamed with Transports Deret in 2009 to implement “last kilometer” deliveries by all-electric trucks. The initiative spanned 31,000 deliveries in 2013 and is now being rolled out in China. Since August 2015, all Sephora stores in Shanghai are supplied by electric trucks, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by around 10 metric tons per year.

For its part, Parfums Christian Dior signed an agreement with the Valet transport company in summer 2015 for deliveries to its Paris points of sale using vehicles powered by natural gas. As a result, Paris customers of the House now know that products have been delivered using clean technology.

© Agence Vu for Sephora